Posts Tagged ‘how to’

How to Copy and Share Google Docs

Wednesday, July 24th, 2013

This video tutorial will walk you through how to copy and share a Google Doc spreadsheet. Please post any comments or questions below.

Copy and Share Google Doc spreadsheet

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WordPress query pages (not posts) using custom fields

Monday, December 5th, 2011

First off, let me say that I am not a master coder and am still learning. Also, I spent many a precious hour trying to find a solution for this. There are probably many easier/better ways to do it, but this definitely works. If you have found a better way, please post it in the comments section.

The Situation
Now, let me explain what it was that I wanted to do. I had several WordPress pages (not posts) with custom fields already set up. I wanted to have only those pages with a particular custom field name appear on a certain page. So, I wanted to create a custom query that would return only those pages with the custom field name.

The Problem
The problem was that most every query that I tried would not return any of the pages. Each one would only return posts (not pages) with that custom field.

I originally started working with query_posts, but I kept running into a problem with the query returning pages that did not have the custom field and also returning multiple instances of the results (probably an issue with where I had placed the wp_reset_query). I also tried this solution with no luck.

The Solution
Many thanks to Ben at Binary Moon for this article and also to this thread on the WordPress forums that helped me quite a bit.

<?php
$pages = array(
'post_type' => 'page',
'meta_key' => 'your_custom_field_name',
'order' => 'asc'
);
$queryObject = new WP_Query($pages);
?>

<?php if ( $queryObject->have_posts() )
while (
$queryObject->have_posts() ) :
$queryObject->the_post();
?>

<!-- Loop or custom code goes here -->

<?php endwhile; ?>

Be sure to:
1.) Set the custom field on your pages, and publish the pages.
2.) Paste the code above into your loop/page template file/wherever you want the results to appear.
3.) Change the bit with your_custom_field_name to the custom field that you have set up on the pages that you want to query.

For more ways to customize and use the information from the custom fields, check out Part I and Part II at the Perishable Press.

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How to Set Up a Twitter Account – Walkthrough

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011

I’m going to assume that you know what tweets are, what following someone means (no, it’s not like stalking), what Twitter is, and that you know whether or not you should be using it and for what reason. I know what can happen when you assume, but for time and web space I’m going to do it anyway.

This is a super basic “How To” guide, if you want to get more in depth, check out How to REALLY Set Up a Twitter Account (this is coming soon, but will be linked once it’s in existence).

Follow these steps in order:
1. Open your favorite web browser.
2. Type the following URL into the address bar https://twitter.com/signup.
3. In the “Full Name” field, enter your full name.
4. In the “Email” field, enter the email address you want to have associated with your Twitter account. This is the address that Twitter will send important messages (like password resets) and updates (new people who are following you on Twitter and alerts when other Twitter users send you a direct message), so choose wisely.

Twitter sign up password error - TwoNineWebDesign.com

Twitter sign up password error.

5. In the “Password” field, enter the password that you would like to use to access your Twitter account. *Make sure you keep a record of this somewhere, especially if you’re not using Twitter regularly. Twitter requires that your password be at least 6 characters. It will let you know if you choose a password that doesn’t meet the requirements. It will also show you a green bar that will give you an idea of how strong (not likely to be figured out by hackers) your password is. You can increase password strength by using a mix of capital letters, numbers, and special characters (-, _, =, +, etc).
6. In the “Username” field, enter the username that you would like to be associated with your account. This is the name that other Twitter users will see when they look at your profile or at your tweets. There is a 15 character limit for usernames, so you will have to choose one that fits in the box. Twitter will check the availability of the username you choose and give you an error message if someone else has already registered that username.
7. Click the “Create my account” button at the bottom of the screen.
8. You may or may not be asked to fill in a captcha field to make sure you are a real person.

Twitter sign up email connect - TwoNineWebDesign.com

Twitter sign up email connect. You can skip this step.

9. Then, navigate through Twitter’s setup. 1.) explaining what a tweet is, 2.) choosing at least 5 people to follow (don’t worry too much, you can always unfollow them later), 3.) adding at least 5 favorites (which are really just choosing 5 more accounts to follow), and then 4.) a request to access your email account to connect with people in your address book (you can choose “skip this step at the bottom of the sidebar on the right).
10. Twitter will send you an email to confirm your email address (which you must do before you will be allowed to use all of Twitter’s features), so check your email, and click the confirmation link. Clicking the link should take you right back into your new Twitter account with a drop down message that lets you know your account has been confirmed.
11. Start tweeting.

That’s all there is to it. Post any questions/issues as comments, and I’ll be happy to help out as much as I can.

Happy tweeting.

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How To Set Up a Website

Thursday, August 25th, 2011

In order to have a website that is viewable on the internet, you must have at least three things. These are: 1.) a domain name, 2.) web hosting, and 3.) website files.

Domain Name

The domain name is the URL, or website address. The domain name of the website you are currently viewing is TwoNineWebDesign.com. In order to claim ownership of a domain name, you must pay a domain name registrar to register the domain name for you. GoDaddy is probably the most commonly known domain name registrar. A registrar will most likely require you to set up an account. Domain name registration is NOT free, but the fees that registrars charge vary. Currently, domain name registration fees range anywhere from $14.95 to $29.99. These fees are recurring and are paid annually. Many registrars offer multi-year domain name registration, so that you do not have to pay each year. Most registrars are very good about notifying you when your domain name registration is about to expire and reminding you to renew; however, if you fail to renew your registration, it will expire, and someone else will be able to buy your domain name.

Web Hosting Provider

A web host is the server where you store the files that tell a web browser how to display your website. Most companies that offer domain name registration also offer web hosting. Some of the basic things that most web hosting providers offer are email accounts, mySQL databases, space on a server, and bandwidth. You should choose a web hosting provider that offers sufficient server space and bandwidth as well as a sufficient number of mySQL databases and email accounts to meet the needs of your website. Web hosting service is usually quoted at a monthly rate, but providers will usually ask you to pay for the entire time period (6 months, 12 months, etc.) up front. Currently, web hosting fees range anywhere from $3.95 per month to $14.95 per month. Many web hosting providers will offer discounts for longer periods of time (i.e., $9.99 per month for 12 months or $7.99 per month for 24 months). It’s a good idea to discuss which web hosting provider you should use with your web designer as many web designers prefer using web hosting providers that they are familiar with.

Website Files

Website files are the files, located on the web server, that actually tell the web browser what your website should look like, including colors, column width and height, where logos appear, etc. Creation of these files is what most people think of when they think of what a web designer does. Website files vary in type and can include anything from html, css, php, asp, javascript, sql, and more. For the purpose of this article, I won’t get into the differences between these file types. You do a quick search on your favorite search engine to learn more. Basically, when you surf the web and look at a web page, you are looking at a website file that is being rendered by your web browser (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, Safari, etc.). You can create website files yourself or hire someone to create them for you. The quality of your website (look and feel of the site) will depend on the knowledge and experience of the person creating the website files. An easy way for someone with little or no experience or knowledge to create website files is to use a content management system (CMS). However, if you want a truly unique and customized look and feel to your website, you will most likely need to find a web designer to create custom website files for you.

Words of Warning

Some small business owners who are not too technically savvy will ask their web designer to take care of all the “website stuff”, including the domain registration and web hosting. A trustworthy web designer will walk you through the process of registering the domain names and setting up the hosting account in YOUR name. A shady web designer will “take care” of it for you by registering the domain name and setting up the hosting account in THEIR name.

DO NOT let your web designer register the domain name or set up the hosting account in anyone’s name but yours. The domain name and the hosting is YOUR property, and YOU should have full control over it and access to it. If you bought a vehicle for your business, you would never consider putting the name of the salesperson who sold it to you on the title. You would be sure to put your name on it because it is your property. The same goes for domain name registration and hosting accounts.

As a small business owner, you may be very trusting and know a “great” person who is a web designer that would never do you wrong. Whether or not you are right about her/his character, you should still have everything in your name. This is because if the domain name registration and hosting account are in the name of your web designer and something happens to her/him (like death), you will have no way of proving that they actually belong to you, and you will have to start from scratch with a new domain name and hosting account.

Save yourself the hassle, and do it properly from the start.

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